Difference between revisions of "Art bronze"

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== Description ==
 
== Description ==
  
A [http://cameo.mfa.org/materials/fullrecord.asp?name=copper copper] alloy used for architectural castings (Brady 1971). Art bronze alloys were usually high in copper with 1-2% [http://cameo.mfa.org/materials/fullrecord.asp?name=zinc zinc] and [http://cameo.mfa.org/materials/fullrecord.asp?name=tin tin]. This produced a dark red color metal. Art bronze is the name used for one of the ASTM category of bronze casting alloys.
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A [[copper|copper]] alloy used for architectural castings (Brady 1971). Art bronze alloys were usually high in copper with 1-2% [[zinc|zinc]] and [[tin|tin]]. This produced a dark red color metal. Art bronze is the name used for one of the ASTM category of bronze casting alloys.
  
 
== Synonyms and Related Terms ==
 
== Synonyms and Related Terms ==
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G.S.Brady, ''Materials Handbook'', 10th edition, McGraw-Hill, New York, 1971.
 
G.S.Brady, ''Materials Handbook'', 10th edition, McGraw-Hill, New York, 1971.
  
== Authority ==
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== Sources Checked for Data in Record ==
  
 
* G.S.Brady, ''Materials Handbook'', McGraw-Hill Book Co., New York, 1971  Comment: p. 121
 
* G.S.Brady, ''Materials Handbook'', McGraw-Hill Book Co., New York, 1971  Comment: p. 121

Latest revision as of 12:52, 29 April 2016

Description

A copper alloy used for architectural castings (Brady 1971). Art bronze alloys were usually high in copper with 1-2% zinc and tin. This produced a dark red color metal. Art bronze is the name used for one of the ASTM category of bronze casting alloys.

Synonyms and Related Terms

architectural bronze; bronze (para arquitectura) (Port.)

Additional Information

G.S.Brady, Materials Handbook, 10th edition, McGraw-Hill, New York, 1971.

Sources Checked for Data in Record

  • G.S.Brady, Materials Handbook, McGraw-Hill Book Co., New York, 1971 Comment: p. 121