Difference between revisions of "Caoutchouc"

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(Synonyms and Related Terms)
 
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[[File:Rubbertreeplantationwk1.jpg|thumb|Rubber tree  
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[[File:Rubbertreeplantationwk1.jpg|thumb|Rubber tree ''Hevea brasiliensis'']]
 
 
''Hevea brasiliensis'']]
 
 
== Description ==
 
== Description ==
  
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[[File:Rubbertreeleaveswk1.jpg|thumb|Rubber tree ''Hevea brasiliensis'']]
 
[[File:Rubbertreeleaveswk1.jpg|thumb|Rubber tree ''Hevea brasiliensis'']]
 
== Synonyms and Related Terms ==
 
== Synonyms and Related Terms ==
[[File:rubbertreewk1.jpg|thumb|Rubber tree   ''Hevea brasiliensis''
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[[File:rubbertreewk1.jpg|thumb|Rubber tree ''Hevea brasiliensis'']]
 
latex; caucho (Esp.); latex (Fr., Port.); caucciù (It.); liquid rubber; rubber latex; elastic gum; India rubber; elastic bitumen; rubber cement; weeping wood; caout-rubber;
 
latex; caucho (Esp.); latex (Fr., Port.); caucciù (It.); liquid rubber; rubber latex; elastic gum; India rubber; elastic bitumen; rubber cement; weeping wood; caout-rubber;
  

Latest revision as of 13:57, 5 August 2020

Rubber tree Hevea brasiliensis

Description

A French term used in Brazil for the milky sap, or latex obtained from various tropical plants from the species Hevea and Ficus. Caoutchouc is a natural rubber composed of polymers of isoprene along with minor impurities of other compounds. It has the capacity for reversible deformation at room temprerature. In 1738, a French research, de la Condamine, presented it's properties, The iin 1839, C. Goodyear discovered theprocess of vulcvanizations., the name caoutchouc was also used for a commercial rubber-based cement in which a small amount of the elastomer was dissolved in a solvent and mixed with mastic. Today, the material is preferentially called Latex or liquid rubber.

Rubber tree Hevea brasiliensis

Synonyms and Related Terms

Rubber tree Hevea brasiliensis

latex; caucho (Esp.); latex (Fr., Port.); caucciù (It.); liquid rubber; rubber latex; elastic gum; India rubber; elastic bitumen; rubber cement; weeping wood; caout-rubber;

Physical Properties

  • Density = 0.92-0.99

Resources and Citations

  • Random House, Webster's Encyclopedic Unabridged Dictionary of the English Language, Grammercy Book, New York, 1997
  • G.S.Brady, Materials Handbook, McGraw-Hill Book Co., New York, 1971 Comment: p. 675
  • Matt Roberts, Don Etherington, Bookbinding and the Conservation of Books: a Dictionary of Descriptive Terminology, U.S. Government Printing Office, Washington DC, 1982
  • Dictionary of Building Preservation, Ward Bucher, ed., John Wiley & Sons, Inc., New York City, 1996
  • Susan E. Schur, Conservation Terminology: A review of Past & Current Nomenclature of Materials, Technology and Conservation, Spring (p.34-39); Summer (p.35-38); Fall (p.25-36), 1985
  • George Savage, Art and Antique Restorer's Handbook, Rockliff Publishing Corp, London, 1954
  • Edward Reich, Carlton J. Siegler, Consumer Goods: How to Know and Use Them, American Book Company, New York City, 1937
  • CRC Handbook of Chemistry and Physics, Robert Weast (ed.), CRC Press, Boca Raton, Florida, v. 61, 1980 Comment: density=0.92-0.99