Difference between revisions of "Gilsonite®"

From CAMEO
Jump to: navigation, search
(talk)
 
m (Text replace - "== Authority ==" to "== Sources Checked for Data in Record ==")
 
(One intermediate revision by one other user not shown)
Line 1: Line 1:
 
== Description ==
 
== Description ==
  
[American Gilsonite Co] A registered trademark for a very pure, rock-hard, [http://cameo.mfa.org/materials/fullrecord.asp?name=asphalt asphalt] originally sold in the late 19th century. Gilsonite®, or uintahite, is a natural [http://cameo.mfa.org/materials/fullrecord.asp?name=bitumen bitumen] found only in the Uinta Mountains of Utah. It is very brittle and lustrous. Gilsonite® is used in black varnishes, lacquers, baking enamels, japans, [http://cameo.mfa.org/materials/fullrecord.asp?name=linoleum linoleum], floor tile and paving where it increases resistance to acids, alkalis and water. In the early 19th century, Gilsonite® was often mixed with [http://cameo.mfa.org/materials/fullrecord.asp?name=mica mica], [http://cameo.mfa.org/materials/fullrecord.asp?name=asbestos asbestos], gums, or resins to produce electrical components. It is also the first solid hydrocarbon to be converted to [http://cameo.mfa.org/materials/fullrecord.asp?name=gasoline gasoline].
+
[American Gilsonite Co] A registered trademark for a very pure, rock-hard, [[asphalt]] originally sold in the late 19th century. Gilsonite®, or uintahite, is a natural [[bitumen]] found only in the Uinta Mountains of Utah. It is very brittle and lustrous. Gilsonite® is used in black varnishes, lacquers, baking enamels, japans, [[linoleum]], floor tile and paving where it increases resistance to acids, alkalis and water. In the early 19th century, Gilsonite® was often mixed with [[mica]], [[asbestos]], gums, or resins to produce electrical components. It is also the first solid hydrocarbon to be converted to [[gasoline]].
  
 
== Synonyms and Related Terms ==
 
== Synonyms and Related Terms ==
Line 29: Line 29:
 
American Gilsonite Co.: [http://www.americangilsonite.com/pdf/chem_adhesives.pdf Website]
 
American Gilsonite Co.: [http://www.americangilsonite.com/pdf/chem_adhesives.pdf Website]
  
== Authority ==
+
== Sources Checked for Data in Record ==
  
 
* Ralph Mayer, ''A Dictionary of Art Terms and Techniques'', Harper and Row Publishers, New York, 1969 (also 1945 printing)
 
* Ralph Mayer, ''A Dictionary of Art Terms and Techniques'', Harper and Row Publishers, New York, 1969 (also 1945 printing)

Latest revision as of 22:05, 30 April 2016

Description

[American Gilsonite Co] A registered trademark for a very pure, rock-hard, asphalt originally sold in the late 19th century. Gilsonite®, or uintahite, is a natural bitumen found only in the Uinta Mountains of Utah. It is very brittle and lustrous. Gilsonite® is used in black varnishes, lacquers, baking enamels, japans, linoleum, floor tile and paving where it increases resistance to acids, alkalis and water. In the early 19th century, Gilsonite® was often mixed with mica, asbestos, gums, or resins to produce electrical components. It is also the first solid hydrocarbon to be converted to gasoline.

Synonyms and Related Terms

uintaite; gilsonita (Esp.); asfaltita (Esp.); uintahite; Gilsonite; asphaltite; Utah coal resin; rock asphalt

FTIR

MFA- Gilsonite.jpg


Other Properties

Soluble in ethanol, turpentine, mineral spirits.

Softening point = 290-400F. Acid value = 2.3

Density 1.04-1.10

Hazards and Safety

Skin contact may cause irritation.

Additional Information

American Gilsonite Co.: Website

Sources Checked for Data in Record

  • Ralph Mayer, A Dictionary of Art Terms and Techniques, Harper and Row Publishers, New York, 1969 (also 1945 printing)
  • Richard S. Lewis, Hawley's Condensed Chemical Dictionary, Van Nostrand Reinhold, New York, 10th ed., 1993
  • The Merck Index, Martha Windholz (ed.), Merck Research Labs, Rahway NJ, 10th edition, 1983 Comment: entry 9977
  • Random House, Webster's Encyclopedic Unabridged Dictionary of the English Language, Grammercy Book, New York, 1997
  • The American Heritage Dictionary or Encarta, via Microsoft Bookshelf 98, Microsoft Corp., 1998