Difference between revisions of "Vermiculite"

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== Description ==
 
== Description ==
  
A laminar micaceous mineral composed of hydrated magnesium aluminum iron silicate. Vermiculite occurs naturally as a compact ore. It is mined in Russia, Australia, Brazil, South Africa, and the U.S. (Montana, North Carolina, South Carolina, Wyoming, Colorado). When vermiculite is heated to about 300 C (570 F), it expands to form highly porous, worm-shaped curls of connected mica-like plates. Expanded vermiculite is used as a fire-resistant insulator, spill absorbent, and packing material. It is also used as a lightweight filler in [[plaster|plaster]], [[concrete|concrete]], [[brick|brick]], [[rubber%2C%20natural|rubber]], [[soil|soil]], [[paper|paper]], [[paint|paint]], and [[plastic|plastics]].
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A laminar micaceous mineral composed of hydrated magnesium aluminum iron silicate. Vermiculite occurs naturally as a compact ore. It is mined in Russia, Australia, Brazil, South Africa, and the U.S. (Montana, North Carolina, South Carolina, Wyoming, Colorado). When vermiculite is heated to about 300 C (570 F), it expands to form highly porous, worm-shaped curls of connected mica-like plates. Expanded vermiculite is used as a fire-resistant insulator, spill absorbent, and packing material. It is also used as a lightweight filler in [[plaster|plaster]], [[concrete|concrete]], [[brick|brick]], [[rubber|rubber]], [[soil|soil]], [[paper|paper]], [[paint|paint]], and [[plastic|plastics]].
  
 
[[File:vermiculite2.jpg|thumb|Vermiculite, expanded]]
 
[[File:vermiculite2.jpg|thumb|Vermiculite, expanded]]
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[[[SliderGallery rightalign|Vermiculite.TIF~FTIR (MFA)]]]
 
[[[SliderGallery rightalign|Vermiculite.TIF~FTIR (MFA)]]]
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== Risks ==
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Vermiculite mined prior to 1990 may contain asbestos which is toxic by ingestion and inhalation. 
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Noncombustible.  Resistant to insects, bacteria, and fungi. 
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Milllipore Sigma: [https://www.sigmaaldrich.com/MSDS/MSDS/DisplayMSDSPage.do?country=US&language=en&productNumber=Z765422&brand=ALDRICH&PageToGoToURL=https%3A%2F%2Fwww.sigmaaldrich.com%2Fcatalog%2Fproduct%2Faldrich%2Fz765422%3Flang%3Den SDS]
  
 
== Other Properties ==
 
== Other Properties ==
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== Hazards and Safety ==
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== Resources and Citations ==
 
 
Vermiculite mined prior to 1990 may contain asbestos which is toxic by ingestion and inhalation. 
 
 
 
Noncombustible.  Resistant to insects, bacteria, and fungi. 
 
 
 
Koos Inc. (MICAFIL): [http://siri.org/msds/f2/bzs/bzscr.html MSDS]
 
 
 
== Sources Checked for Data in Record ==
 
  
 
* ''The Merck Index'', Martha Windholz (ed.), Merck Research Labs, Rahway NJ, 10th edition, 1983  Comment: entry 10095
 
* ''The Merck Index'', Martha Windholz (ed.), Merck Research Labs, Rahway NJ, 10th edition, 1983  Comment: entry 10095
  
* ''Encyclopedia Britannica'', http://www.britannica.com  Comment: Vermiculite." Encyclopædia Britannica. 16 Mar. 2004 .
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* ''Encyclopedia Britannica'', http://www.britannica.com  Comment: Vermiculite." (Accessed 16 Mar. 2004).
  
* Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia, at http://www.wikipedia.com  Comment: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Vermiculite (Accessed Sept. 20, 2005)
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* Wikipedia: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Vermiculite (Accessed Sept. 20, 2005)
  
 
* Richard S. Lewis, ''Hawley's Condensed Chemical Dictionary'', Van Nostrand Reinhold, New York, 10th ed., 1993
 
* Richard S. Lewis, ''Hawley's Condensed Chemical Dictionary'', Van Nostrand Reinhold, New York, 10th ed., 1993
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* Michael McCann, ''Artist Beware'', Watson-Guptill Publications, New York City, 1979
 
* Michael McCann, ''Artist Beware'', Watson-Guptill Publications, New York City, 1979
  
* Ceramics and Glass Conservation Section, List of Workshop Materials, The British Museum, London
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* Ceramics and Glass Conservation Section, List of Workshop Materials, The British Museum, London.
  
  
  
 
[[Category:Materials database]]
 
[[Category:Materials database]]

Latest revision as of 14:48, 5 August 2020

Vermiculite mineral

Description

A laminar micaceous mineral composed of hydrated magnesium aluminum iron silicate. Vermiculite occurs naturally as a compact ore. It is mined in Russia, Australia, Brazil, South Africa, and the U.S. (Montana, North Carolina, South Carolina, Wyoming, Colorado). When vermiculite is heated to about 300 C (570 F), it expands to form highly porous, worm-shaped curls of connected mica-like plates. Expanded vermiculite is used as a fire-resistant insulator, spill absorbent, and packing material. It is also used as a lightweight filler in Plaster, Concrete, Brick, Rubber, Soil, Paper, Paint, and plastics.

Vermiculite, expanded

Synonyms and Related Terms

hydrated magnesium aluminum iron silicate; exfoliated hydrobiotite; Zonolite insulation; Microfil; Microlite; Verxite

FTIR (MFA)

Vermiculite.TIF


Risks

Vermiculite mined prior to 1990 may contain asbestos which is toxic by ingestion and inhalation.

Noncombustible. Resistant to insects, bacteria, and fungi.

Milllipore Sigma: SDS

Other Properties

Unaffected by water, acids, alkalis or organic solvents.

Can expand 6-20 times when heated. Expanded vermiculite can absorb 200-500% of its weight in liquid.

Fracture = unvevn Crystal system = monoclinic Cleavage = perfect Streak = pale yellow

CAS 1318-00-9
Mohs Hardness 2-3
Density 0.04-0.15 (expanded)

Resources and Citations

  • The Merck Index, Martha Windholz (ed.), Merck Research Labs, Rahway NJ, 10th edition, 1983 Comment: entry 10095
  • Richard S. Lewis, Hawley's Condensed Chemical Dictionary, Van Nostrand Reinhold, New York, 10th ed., 1993
  • Dictionary of Building Preservation, Ward Bucher, ed., John Wiley & Sons, Inc., New York City, 1996
  • Random House, Webster's Encyclopedic Unabridged Dictionary of the English Language, Grammercy Book, New York, 1997
  • The American Heritage Dictionary or Encarta, via Microsoft Bookshelf 98, Microsoft Corp., 1998
  • Michael McCann, Artist Beware, Watson-Guptill Publications, New York City, 1979
  • Ceramics and Glass Conservation Section, List of Workshop Materials, The British Museum, London.