Kodel®

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Kodel®

Description

[Eastman Chemical, TN] A registered trademark for a series of polyester staple and filament fibers. The original Kodel® fiber introduced in 1958 (now labeled as the 200 series) is a PCDT material prepared from dimethyl terephthalate and 1,4-cyclohexane dimethanol. Newer Kodel® fibers (400 series) are made from polyethylene terephthalate and have characteristics similar to Dacron®. The 200 series Kodel® fiber is a white and is easily dyed. It has good dimensional stability and wear resistance. Kodel® is used for carpets and easy care apparel. It is often blended with cotton to produce crease resistant garment fabrics. Kodel® is also used for fiberfill because it has good resilience and is nonallergenic.

Kodel®

Synonyms and Related Terms

polyester; PCDT; poly-1,4-cyclohexylene-dimethylene terephthalate

Other Properties

For 200 series: Insoluble in acids and alkali. May shrink in hot water and in chlorinated dry cleaning solvents. Fiber is smooth. Cross section is circular. Tenacity = 2.5-3.0 g/denier Elongation = 24-34% Moisture regain = 0.4%

Melting Point 290-295
Density 1.22-1.23

Hazards and Safety

Burns slowly and forms drops. Resistant to sunlight.

Additional Information

° Kodak: History° G.Cook, Handbook of Textile Fibres:II. Man-made Fibres, 5th edition, Merrow Publishing Co., Durham, England, 1984.

Sources Checked for Data in Record

  • Marjory L. Joseph, Introductory Textile Science, Holt, Rinehart and Winston, Fort Worth, TX, 1986
  • Identification of Textile Materials, The Textile Institute, Manchester, England, 1985
  • Fairchild's Dictionary of Textiles, Phyllis G.Tortora, Robert S. Merkel (eds.), Fairchild Publications, New York City, 7th edition, 1996 Comment: production discontinued in 1993
  • J.Gordon Cook, Handbook of Textile Fibres:II Man-made Fibres, Merrow Publishing Co. , Durham, England
  • G.S.Brady, Materials Handbook, McGraw-Hill Book Co., New York, 1971 Comment: p. 626
  • Richard S. Lewis, Hawley's Condensed Chemical Dictionary, Van Nostrand Reinhold, New York, 10th ed., 1993
  • Random House, Webster's Encyclopedic Unabridged Dictionary of the English Language, Grammercy Book, New York, 1997
  • The Merck Index, Martha Windholz (ed.), Merck Research Labs, Rahway NJ, 10th edition, 1983 Comment: entry 5329