Difference between revisions of "Dogwood"

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[[File:Dogwoodf5.jpg|thumb|Flowering dogwood
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[[File:Dogwoodf5.jpg|thumb|Flowering dogwood ''Cornus florida'']]
 
 
''Cornus florida'']]
 
 
== Description ==
 
== Description ==
  
 
A hardwood tree from the family Cornaceae found throughout Europe, Asia and the North America. Although dogwood is primarily grown as an ornamental tree, its fine-grain wood is hard and heavy. It has been used for small ornamental items and utilitarian items such as skate rollers, golf club heads, and pulleys. Since the 1970s, many dogwoods in North America have been damaged or killed by the dogwood blight disease.
 
A hardwood tree from the family Cornaceae found throughout Europe, Asia and the North America. Although dogwood is primarily grown as an ornamental tree, its fine-grain wood is hard and heavy. It has been used for small ornamental items and utilitarian items such as skate rollers, golf club heads, and pulleys. Since the 1970s, many dogwoods in North America have been damaged or killed by the dogwood blight disease.
 
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[[File:cfloridaflower2.jpg|thumb|Flowering dogwood ''Cornus florida'']]
 
== Synonyms and Related Terms ==
 
== Synonyms and Related Terms ==
  
 
''Cornaceae''; flowering dogwood (''Cornus florida''); kornel (Dan.); Hartriegel (Deut.); Hornstrauch (Deut.); cornouiller (Fr.)
 
''Cornaceae''; flowering dogwood (''Cornus florida''); kornel (Dan.); Hartriegel (Deut.); Hornstrauch (Deut.); cornouiller (Fr.)
  
[[File:cfloridaflower2.jpg|thumb|Flowering dogwood
 
 
''Cornus florida'']]
 
 
== Other Properties ==
 
== Other Properties ==
 
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==Resources and Citations==
Tree height = 40 feet (maximum)  Flowers = white or pink in springtime followed by red oval-shaped berries in the fall.
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* Tree height = 40 feet (maximum)   
 
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* Flowers = white or pink in springtime followed by red oval-shaped berries in the fall.
{| class="wikitable"
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* Density = 47 ppcf
|-
 
! scope="row"| Density
 
| 47 ppcf
 
|}
 
 
 
== Additional Information ==
 
 
 
Schoch, W., Heller, I., Schweingruber, F.H., Kienast, F., 2004:[http://www.woodanatomy.ch/ Wood anatomy of central European Species]: Common Dogwood,[http://www.woodanatomy.ch/species.php?code=COSA Cornus sanguinea L.]
 
  
 
== Additional Images ==
 
== Additional Images ==
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</gallery>
 
</gallery>
  
 
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==Resources and Citations==
== Authority ==
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* Schoch, W., Heller, I., Schweingruber, F.H., Kienast, F., 2004:[http://www.woodanatomy.ch/ Wood anatomy of central European Species]: Common Dogwood,[http://www.woodanatomy.ch/species.php?code=COSA Cornus sanguinea L.]
  
 
* G.S.Brady, ''Materials Handbook'', McGraw-Hill Book Co., New York, 1971  Comment: p. 273
 
* G.S.Brady, ''Materials Handbook'', McGraw-Hill Book Co., New York, 1971  Comment: p. 273
  
* Website address 1  Comment: Olympus Microscopy Resource Center at http://www.olympusmicro.com/galleries/abramowitz/pages/cornusfloridaradialsmall.html
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* Olympus Microscopy Resource Center at http://www.olympusmicro.com/galleries/abramowitz/pages/cornusfloridaradialsmall.html
  
* Website address 2  Comment: Virginia Tech Dendrology website at www.fw.vt.edu/dendro/dendrology/main.htm (accessed Oct. 3, 2005)
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* Virginia Tech Dendrology website at www.fw.vt.edu/dendro/dendrology/main.htm (accessed Oct. 3, 2005)
  
* Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia, at http://www.wikipedia.com  Comment: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Dogwood (Accessed Oct. 3, 2005)
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* Wikipedia: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Dogwood (Accessed Oct. 3, 2005)
  
 
* ''CRC Handbook of Chemistry and Physics'', Robert Weast (ed.), CRC Press, Boca Raton, Florida, v. 61, 1980  Comment: density=47 ppcf (0.76 g/cm3)
 
* ''CRC Handbook of Chemistry and Physics'', Robert Weast (ed.), CRC Press, Boca Raton, Florida, v. 61, 1980  Comment: density=47 ppcf (0.76 g/cm3)

Latest revision as of 14:32, 22 July 2022

Flowering dogwood Cornus florida

Description

A hardwood tree from the family Cornaceae found throughout Europe, Asia and the North America. Although dogwood is primarily grown as an ornamental tree, its fine-grain wood is hard and heavy. It has been used for small ornamental items and utilitarian items such as skate rollers, golf club heads, and pulleys. Since the 1970s, many dogwoods in North America have been damaged or killed by the dogwood blight disease.

Flowering dogwood Cornus florida

Synonyms and Related Terms

Cornaceae; flowering dogwood (Cornus florida); kornel (Dan.); Hartriegel (Deut.); Hornstrauch (Deut.); cornouiller (Fr.)

Other Properties

Resources and Citations

  • Tree height = 40 feet (maximum)
  • Flowers = white or pink in springtime followed by red oval-shaped berries in the fall.
  • Density = 47 ppcf

Additional Images

Resources and Citations

  • G.S.Brady, Materials Handbook, McGraw-Hill Book Co., New York, 1971 Comment: p. 273
  • Virginia Tech Dendrology website at www.fw.vt.edu/dendro/dendrology/main.htm (accessed Oct. 3, 2005)
  • CRC Handbook of Chemistry and Physics, Robert Weast (ed.), CRC Press, Boca Raton, Florida, v. 61, 1980 Comment: density=47 ppcf (0.76 g/cm3)
  • Random House, Webster's Encyclopedic Unabridged Dictionary of the English Language, Grammercy Book, New York, 1997
  • The American Heritage Dictionary or Encarta, via Microsoft Bookshelf 98, Microsoft Corp., 1998

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