Dutch metal

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Description

A malleable brass alloy prepared as an inexpensive imitation gold leaf. Dutch metal, or Dutch gold, contained approximately 80-88% copper and 12-20% zinc. It was invented by Prince Rubert (1619 - 1682) in Bavaria. Dutch metal is pressed into thin foil sheets to imitate gold leaf for gilding frames, polychrome sculptures and furniture. It tarnishes rapidly and must be coated with varnish, shellac, or wax for protection. Dutch metal is sensitive to pollutants, such as hydrogen sulfide, and to some plasticizers.

Synonyms and Related Terms

metal leaf; composition leaf; bronze leaf; blocking foil; Dutch mineral; Dutch gold, Dutch leaf; tombac; Dutch foil; bronzine (Fr.); Schlagmetall (Deut.); schlag leaf; bronzine; brass leaf; Deutsche gold; German gold

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