Brocade

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Description

A heavy fabric, with an elaborate, raised design interwoven on a satin or twill weave background. Brocade originated in France and was usually made with a jacquard weaving mechanism. The embossed fabric, usually made from silk or cotton, can have gold or silver interlaced threads. It is used for upholstery, draperies, and wall coverings.

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Synonyms and Related Terms

brocado (Esp.); brocart (Fr.); Brokaat (Ned); lamé; brocatelle;

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Authority

  • Hermann Kuhn, Conservation and Restoration of Works of Art and Antiquities, Butterworths, London, 1986
  • Hoechst Celanese Corporation, Dictionary of Fiber & Textile Technology (older version called Man-made Fiber and Textile Dictionary, 1965), Hoechst Celanese Corporation, Charlotte NC, 1990
  • Matt Roberts, Don Etherington, Bookbinding and the Conservation of Books: a Dictionary of Descriptive Terminology, U.S. Government Printing Office, Washington DC, 1982
  • Random House, Webster's Encyclopedic Unabridged Dictionary of the English Language, Grammercy Book, New York, 1997
  • The American Heritage Dictionary or Encarta, via Microsoft Bookshelf 98, Microsoft Corp., 1998
  • Edward Reich, Carlton J. Siegler, Consumer Goods: How to Know and Use Them, American Book Company, New York City, 1937
  • Website address 1 Comment: www.fabrics.net

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